Curb Appeal

Hey There, Hosta!

Simply edging the grass can really make a visual impact in your yard’s appearance. However, adding a plant or light edging to your pathway can take your curb appeal to the next level!

A few plants to consider for your path edges:

Hostas: This shade loving plant produces wide plush leaves, available in variegated colors. This plant’s consistent growth makes maintenance simple. Established plants also produce flower stalks.

Liriope: This is a low maintenance, fairly drought tolerant option to beautify your walkways. This grass like plant comes in a few varieties of colors and grow tiny flower stalks too.

Vinca: This pretty flower-based bush is a very hearty plant that reseeds – which means it continuously fills dedicated areas with vibrant flowers. These relatively low maintenance flowers are available in a variety of colors too!

Lighting: Path lights are an easy way to upgrade your walkways. These days solar and dusk-to-dawn options make installation and maintenance even more simple. We found the options below on Amazon.

Okay, I chose my plant or light, now how do I arrange them?

Plants: Plan for what size the plant will be, not what it is when you buy it. Check the information label on your plant, if the plant will grow to be at least 3 feet wide and 3 feet tall, we’d want to plant them at least 4 feet apart.

Plants AND Lights: Place the lights evenly between each plant so it looks like a planned design.

Lights Only: Use a yard stick or measuring tape to evenly space the lights.

PLANT TIPS:

  • A yard stick is a great tool for spacing.
  • Lay out the plants in their containers to visualize the spacing before digging holes. (Use sticks or paint stirrers to do the same thing for spacing lights.)
  • Be sure to choose plants that are right for the amount of sun or shade in your selected area.
  • Water regularly, this is especially important when newly planted.
  • Before you buy, be sure to research and/or check with a plant specialist at the nursery for information on the plants you like. A good nursery will usually have specific plant information, care tips, and will give you suggestions for planting them to flourish.
  • Research plant safety around pets and children.
Curb Appeal

Create an Instant Butterfly Garden

Grab the garden gloves! Today, we’re creating a not-so-secret garden that continuously attracts beautiful butterflies and their whimsical friends. The best news is, you can create a butterfly garden on a small budget with just a few good plants – which means you can have fun growing your garden by collecting plants little by little if the need be.

D&CO. PRO TIP: Buy in threes. Three always seems to be the magic number for how many plants to buy, especially when starting out. Grouping three of the same plants together (planting a few feet apart for growth) usually makes the best visual, and also makes it easy for butterflies to find.

Most of the plants that attract butterflies love the Florida sunshine, therefore a great area for a butterfly garden is one that has at least part sun – check plant labels or with an associate for specific plant care and warnings*. Butterfly plants are usually simple looking, with lots of green leaves and small flower accents. A butterfly garden should grow a little more wild than be perfectly trimmed and shaped all the time, if you want the plants to attract the most winged visitors. (Too frequent trimming gets rid of flowers and buds, which are what attracts the butterflies.) Approach your butterfly garden design more like you are building a theme park for butterflies, than creating a traditional tightly manicured garden.

Common Butterfly Attractors:


Monarch Caterpillar eating Milkweed leaves

Milkweed
The easiest way to get butterflies to show up in your yard is to plant some Milkweed. Milkweed is a host plant for Monarch butterflies and comes in a few varieties. We like the type pictured here best. It’s labeled a “host plant” because Monarch butterflies lay their eggs on the plant so caterpillars have something to eat when they hatch. The caterpillars will eat this plant down to a nub. Don’t worry, the plant continuously leafs out and grows back again. We suggest planting it behind or among other plants so that you don’t notice as much when the caterpillars eat it all – and they will absolutely eat it ALL! Note: Milkweed is toxic to nearly everything but the Monarch caterpillar, so keep it away from curious children and animals. 


Penta flowers with butterfly

Pentas
These tiny star flowers come in a variety of colors and attracts butterflies, hummingbirds, honey bees, bumble bees… all of the little creatures that make a garden magical. Note: Some varieties are long and leggy, some are neat and shrub-like. Be sure to check labels or ask an associate about the type of penta you are purchasing, so that you know what space is best for planting it.


Yellow Shrimp Plant

Shrimp Plants
Shrimp plants have flowers that kind of look like little shrimps from a distance. It’s a butterfly favorite in any color. Note: Hummingbirds LOVE this plant too. In our yard, they seem to gravitate to the red variety. 

 

 


Plumbago with lots of flowers!

Plumbago
This one is a large loose bush that butterflies and hummingbirds love. You want to keep it a little wild so that the flowers are always plentiful and present – it’s what the butterflies are attracted to and feeding on. 

 

Plumbago

By adding all or any of these four simple butterfly attractors, your garden is sure to be a hit with all kinds of butterflies.  

Share your butterfly gardens with @DeAnnaAndCompany by using the hashtag #GrowWithDandCO

* Keep in mind: some plants can be toxic to animals and humans. Be sure to check labels and with a knowledgable plant associate for information. Additionally, it’s a good rule of thumb to always wear gloves and eye protection while gardening, and to thoroughly wash hands/shower after.